BOOK REVIEW, DEVELOPING ROUTINES

Atomic Habits by James Clear

Fabulous, fabulous, fabulous book.

James Clear’s book is all about how to build productive habits (make them easy, attractive, and enjoyable) and how to stop destructive habits (make them difficult and uncomfortable). He presents his case and breaks it down. I have actually already started developing better habit management due to reading his book!

Most people think that building better habits or changing your actions is all about willpower or motivation. But the more I learn, the more I believe that the number one driver of better habits and behavior change is the choice architecture of your environment.

–Excerpt from Atomic Habits by James

His book helps you understand WHY we end up with counterproductive habits that are difficult to change.  Through his research, he has developed simple structured ways for us to work with ourselves.  I like that it removes some of the self-bashing and turns it into better planning.

But wait… there’s more!

One of my all time favourite business models lately is the “freemium” model from writers and experts. They create content, but they give a lot of it away for free, whether on their website, via videos/webinars or by regular email messages. It’s like the great bands who would play in local pubs and bars. You feel like you get to know them well and you start to like them personally because you can feel them authentically sharing themselves. The author of this book engages with his readers in many ways and you get so much value that you feel GREAT about buying his book.

Valuable and Short Emails

I’m a sucker for subscribing to emails.  The website looks interesting and I hit ‘subscribe’ – and then after a month or so of ignoring and deleting the emails, I unsubscribe. I used to think, Maybe I’m just a loser, I pick bad emails. Or maybe I’m just lazy, I don’t read emails I should read. No, no, I’ve got it, I can’t commit to anything I should do. 

Then I decided to be kind to myself: I have a lot of curiosity and I like to give everyone a chance. So I subscribe and check them out, then I delete when they don’t delight me. And given that I’m still subscribed to his list 2 months later, you can guess what I think of James Clear’s emails–they are the BEST! My favourite is his weekly 3-2-1 newsletter: 3 ideas from him, 2 quotes from others and 1 question for you to ponder.  Easy read, but definitely a positive pick-me-upper.

Informative and Easy to Read Website

His website is also a great resource for information about better habits, better performance, better thinking, and optimal health. It’s simply organized and chock full of science-backed studies written in simple language. It gives you a taste of how his book is written and organized. I love how this is not one of those self-help sites that almost make you feel worse for not being able to do it. He actually explains WHY it’s hard to do the right thing.

Free Bonus Materials!

He even makes you feel really good for buying his book by immediately giving you bonus materials, like a chapter on how to apply it to parenting. It takes the structure that you learn from his book and gives you real life examples of how you can help your kids develop better habits. I’m excitedly starting to use this and fingers crossed the kids will not catch on too quickly. Shhh! Don’t tell them I’m testing his suggestions out on them! 

Summary

I don’t have to feel shame and guilt for having limited willpower and motivation. I can spend the time and headspace to design the architecture of my environment and make little adjustments.

In conclusion, one of the most impactful self-help books I’ve ever read.

DEVELOPING ROUTINES

The Rs: Routine and Ritual, Reflection and Restoration

Walking the dog and showering. Brushing teeth and driving. Washing dishes and folding laundry.

What do all these things have in common? They are daily routines when our brains can go on autopilot, requiring very little headspace for the task at hand, which allows us to.. well… do free thinking. Think about whatever our mind wants to wander that has nothing to do with the task at hand. Like work stresses, kid problems, the argument from the previous night. A dream. A memory. Maybe a cool ah ha.

When doing these easy routine tasks, it’s like you have two completely different sets of brains. Remember when you were driving somewhere and had no idea what route you took? Your body just automatically paused at the stop signs and parallel parked, while you were completely lost in your thoughts.

It’s as if certain movements, easy and familiar, allow us to separate the thoughts brain from the doing brain.

Nightly prayer and daily meditation. Yoga and breathing exercises.

What do all these things have in common? They are planned rituals that force our brain to focus on something that requires… focus. It’s a moment in time not to think about work stresses, kid problems, the argument from the previous night. It’s time to get in synch with our breathing, emotions, and merge physical with the mental. It’s an opportunity to reflect consciously about the now. It’s a mindful and purposeful effort to reflect, rest, reset, and restore.

What routines and rituals do you do that help you reflect and restore?